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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)
. affiliated movements have taken us beyond the core leadership in afghanistan and pakistan, including the middle east, and east africa, central asia, and southeast asia. although each group is unique, all aspire to advance al qaeda's agenda by stabilizing the companies in which they operate and attacking the u.s. and plotting to strike it u.s. homeland. in south asia, al qaeda continues to pose a threat from its base of operation in pakistan's tribal areas. in order to use that to carry a attacks against a homeland as well as our interests and those of our allies and partners in pakistan, afghanistan, india, and europe. the united states faces to counter terrorism charges -- a direct threat posed by al qaeda in the arabian peninsula and the individuals and charities that flow from the region to al qaeda and its affiliates from world. on this point particularly, i want to emphasize severing the pipeline is a major part of what we're doing in its administration. al qaeda has shifted its activities to the relative safe haven of northern mali where it is training fighters and other allied
people were injured. the attack follows another strike in pakistan that killed up to 18 people on sunday. speaking reuters, the former commander of u.s. troops in afghanistan, retired general stanley mcchrystal, issued his strongest criticism to date of the drone attacks saying -- meanwhile, a former adviser to obama and security issues has forcefully come out against drone warfare saying it is encouraging arms proliferation worldwide while causing unknown civilian casualties. writing in this month's issue of international affairs, michael boyle, an advisor on the obama campaign's counter-terrorism expert group in 2007, 2008, writes -- president obama has formally unveiled his second term nominations for two key cabinet posts, a former republican senator chuck hagel for defense secretary and counterterrorism advisor john brennan to the helm the cia. they appeared with obama on monday at the white house. >> am also grateful for opportunity to help continue to strengthen our country and our alliances. in advance global freedom, decency, humanity. as we help build a better world for all man
our government carries out these kinds of attacks is of course in pakistan. in 2010 we saw what the obama administration was going to be like on this score. there was a u.s. drone strike in pakistan roughly every three days in 2010. 9 new america foundation tracks these things and their record shows it was an unprecedented spike in terms of how frequently we were killing people in pakistan using this particular method of killing people even though pakistan is supposedly not a war zone for us, at least not more than anywhere else in the world. interestingly, though, in 2013 it dropped off. in 2011 we launched from dropping drone strikes in pakistan roughly every three days to launching them on average every five days. then in 2012 it dropped off even further. we were launching a drone strike in pakistan about every seven or eight days as of 2012. well, how is this year shaping up? it is january 10th. so so far there have only been ten days in 2013. of those ten days in 2013 so far we have launched a drone strike in pakistan on seven out of those ten days. now, maybe that is an ab
it comes down, it comes down all at once. we're seeing huge drops in china, massive floods in pakistan. there was hurricane sandy in the u.s. all around the world, a couple of years back in the kremlin, they had to ban wheat exports because they're having such extreme heat waves the could not export it anymore. we saw the price of grain go up threefold around the world. the message from all of this and what our weather agencies have been telling us, this is the new normal. this is not some freak extreme weather event. we have seen a trend over the past few decades of extreme weather events on the rise, getting worse and worse as we put more carbon pollution into the atmosphere and make climate change worse. >> you're just in antarctica. can you describe going from australia to antarctica and back? >> i just got back to australia yesterday from antarctica, where i was talking to people there about the impacts of climate change. western and predict that is still very cold, but it is actually the most quickly warming land mass. west antarctica has more than three times the global average
drastically increased the use of predator drones. 329 targeted strikes have taken place in pakistan since 2004, but the vast majority have taken place since 2009. although opposition to the president's use of drones has remained largely silent, that seems to be changing. two days ago in hawaii protesters paraded signs close to where the first family was vacationing, which read drones kill kids and is it really okay if obama does it? last week a federal judge ruled the administration did not need to disclose internal communications about the drone program. the "new york times" and the aclu had filed requests in 2011 for the legal justification of these targeted killings, including the drone strike that killed anwar al alaki, an american citizen living in yemen. the white house denied that request for purposes of national security. the judge approved the administration's right to keep that information classified, but still questioned the drone program, writing, "i can find no way around the thicket of laws and precedents that effectively allow the executive brarchg of our government to proclaim
is among eight people killed by a u.s. drone strike in pakistan. as you probably know the obama administration has stepped up the use of drones overseas to target suspected terrorists. president obama's nomination of john brennan to be the next cia director suggests that trend is likely to continue. brennan, a strong proponent of drones as the president's chief counterterrorism advisor. for more on how the u.s. drone program works let's get to chief washington correspondent james rosen. he is live for us at the state department. james? >> reporter: jon, good morning. this program presents a consistent headache for the diplomats in this building and who must frequently contend with complaints from afghan and pakistani officials who say these drones all too often wind up killing innocent civilians instead of terrorists the drone program is one of the national security initiatives that president obama inherited from the bush administration and one which the current commander-in-chief has dramatically expanded. for all his criticism of president bush during the 2008 campaign over hi
reportedly has decided to exclude cia drone strikes in pakistan from new legal oversight for targeted killings overseas. the washington post reports counter-terrorism adviser and cia-nominee john brennan has signed off on a plan to exempt the drone attacks in pakistan from a list of operations that would be covered under newly enacted rules. areas covered in the so-called play book include the process for adding names to kill lists, the principles for killing u.s. citizens abroad, and the command chain for authorizing cia or u.s. military strikes outside war zones. the exemption of drone strikes in pakistan would allow the cia to continue carrying them without -- tearing them without a legal framework for a to two years. the hostage standoff in a jury of his ended in the deaths of dozens of people, including up to 48 of the captured workers. algerian forces say they recovered at least 25 bodies after storming the militant held gas complex saturday, bringing the confirmed death toll to least 80. witnesses say the hostages were brutally executed. the toll could have been worse as hundre
strike in pakistan. the seventh such attack in two weeks. today's started the main town in the north waziristan tribal area. strikes likebe that one are not popular in pakistan or at home with many on the left. the president nominee to head the c.i.a. is the architect of the drone policy. tonight, chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge tells us john brennan facing questions how questions were asked under his watch. >> with 25 years at the agency, john brennan's career overlaps with the c.i.a. interrogation program under president bush, which included the waterboarding of self-described khalid sheikh mohammed. the american civil libertys union said despite raising concerns over the terrorism tactics of the white house, they should not move on the nomination until all senators can assess the role of the c.i.a. and any role by bren nan himself in forture. the choice of brennan the aclu sees a largeer program. >> much of the legal architecture that the bush administration used to justify so-called war on terror is being continued by the obama administration. >> with the 6,00
in pakistan. the u.s. war on terror grown reliant on the unmanned vehicles that are prepared for flight an armed with the hell fire missiles. >> i believe john brennan taking over at c.i.a. will ensure that the drone program will comet. the administration has been -- and brennan particular, selling us on the fact that drones is the magic weapon. >> bret: >> reporter: president bam banal herted the drones from the predecessor. despite his criticism of bush, he has empanded the program employing agilities to authorize 300 drone strikes that killed # ,500 people. it has long strangeed relakes with pakistan and civilian who complain about the civilian casualties. >> we endeavor to redouse zillian casualties as much as possible. -- civilian casualties as much as possible. taking the fight to al-qaeda made the united states safer. >> worked to embed evidents to a strong legal frame wok. >> civil bi liberty groups. >> the u.s. government is using drones far from the battlefield to kill people who are not presenting any threat to the united states. that is the under which force used forren the
are looking at this, is there are regions of yemen or pakistan where president obama has authorized the u.s. to strike even if they don't know the identities of the people that are striking. the so-called signature strike policy. the idea of being a military- aged man in these areas, there targets based on their gender and age and geographic presence, those are going to be legitimate targets? >> explain that. >> this is something that started under the bush administration. when president obama first took office, he was briefed on this by the then director or outgoing director of the cia, michael hayden. they had developed this policy called signature strikes. if an individual had contact with certain other individuals, traveling a certain area, as certain times, gathering with a certain number of people there was a presumption they must be up to no good, that they are suspected militants or terrorists in the u.s. could take pre-emptive action against those people. and by that i mean, killing them with a missile. there was authorization to do that. in some cases the president has pre-clear
in the latest u.s. drone attacks on pakistan's tribal areas. the strikes hit what pakistani officials described as separate compounds belonging to the pakistani taliban in south missouri stan. the taliban commander was reportedly among the dead. the ongoing drone attacks come days after a federal judge ruled the obama administration is under no obligation to publicly disclose their legal justification. the american civil liberties union and the new york times had filed a lawsuit under the freedom of information act demanding u.s. government disclose the legal basis for launching drone strikes overseas. the suit was filed after the u.s. kill the american-born cleric anwar al awlaki in yemen despite having never charged him with a crime. in upholding the obama at the ministration's right to secrecy, u.s. district judge colleen mcmahon expressed misgivings about the drone program itself writing -- the alice-in-wonderland nature some of the first details have emerged on the white house's effort to tackle gun control in the aftermath of last month's shooting massacre in newtown, connecticut. the was
libya and egypt and syria and pakistan. we are talking about a world that is changing and is less responsive to u.s. pressure and u.s. military power and diplomacy. that changes something that chuck hagel is aware of and he has well-formed views on. at the heart of that view is that power should be diffused away from the american military and plates and other power centers around the world and that idea itself is controversial. president obama agrees with that and many in congress do not. host: the former senator gave an interview with his former state paper, "the lincoln journal star" he said his critics have distorted his views. guest: it is unusual for a to give any interviews at all but he has faced a much criticism that he wanted to get one opening salvo out there and that is what he did. he basically said that he will have a chance to correct the record during his confirmation hearing. we should note from that interview that he is not backing down from any of his positions. he is not saying he no longer believes in the things that he believed in that were so controversial. h
suddenly without warning. the drone strike which killed several militants in pakistan's rugged tribal area is causing new controversy. jill dougherty has details for us. what's going on some. >> wolf, u.s. official now is confirming the death of that key warlord. he is not saying how he died but he does say that he and his men were directly responsible for planning and carrying out cross border attacks on coalition forces in afghanistan as well as providing protection for al qaeda forces in pakistan. pakistani intelligence officials tell cnn what they believe was a u.s. drone has killed a key pakistani taliban commander in south waziristan. pakistani warlord who sent his men to afghanistan to fight u.s. and nato troops. the pentagon is not confirming his death but senior officials are calling reports that he died a major development. nazeer, they say, had a lot of blood on his hands. george little, pemt gone spokesman said, any time a bad guy has a bad day, it's a good day for us. but in pakistan, fury over the killing. a man who played both sides. >> he was one of the top commanders of th
for the administration on several occasions. >> rose: syria, for example. >> pakistan, syria, other places. and i suspect that president obama is not going to see in senator john kerry as much of an independent operator as we saw with, say, secretary clinton who pressed very hard with bob gates for a much more muscular expansion of the surge in afghanistan. she pressed very hard for the libya intervention. and i'm -- it's not clear to me yet that secretary kerry, if he is confirmed, would necessarily press as hard as she did on those issues. he may well surprise us on that. >> rose: she has high public marks for what she did as secretary of state. among the foreign policy people, what do they look at as her principal accomplishment? >> i think that the public marks have been a little bit higher, charlie, than what you hear from within the foreign policy community. that's usually the case in these cases. certainly when she went around the world she was a star in her own right. she certainly stood for a number of women's rights issues that are near and dear to her heart. but it was interesting out of this
. the president said he had approved a covert mission inside pakistan that resulted in the death of the founder and later of al qaeda, the group that attacked us on september 11th, 2001, which led congress to pass the authorization for use of military force, which has justified the 12 years of war that have followed ever since. so the announcement that bin laden was dead on may 21st -- excuse me, on may 1st, 2010, may 1st, 2010. two days later, two days later on may 3rd, 2010, two days after that announcement, retired senator chuck hagel gave an interview to his hometown paper in lincoln, nebraska "the journal star." he told the paper it should reassure america and the world that america is still a leader, and we can and will get the job done. he said, quote, that is very important for the world to realize. more the point, though, chuck hagel then said, "well, now that we've killed osama bin laden, let's leave afghanistan." he said that the pursuit of bin laden and al qaeda was, quote, the reason we invaded afghanistan ten years ago. now that bin laden was dead, the president he said has to, qu
in pakistan. but the use of the drones expand beyond, this discussion of how they can be used else where in africa and this goes far beyond the initial legal definition of pursuing a war against those who had perpetrated 9/11. so, i think mr. brennan has been trying to move the justifications to match the current circumstances. and the question is, will they be beyond the law? a very central proponent of the light footprint strategy. special forces in place of sending in 1 00,000 troops to iraq or afghanistan or to a ground invasion in libya or syria and that's now beginning to run a little bit to the end of its utility as you've seen in syria. so, i think he'll get a lot of questions about that, as well. >> david, who runs the drone war? the cia and the pentagon and who should run the drone war? >> well, there are two wars. the pentagon does the overuse of drones. so, we can use them, say, in afghanistan. where there is a declared military action. but in pakistan or any place where it's used in a covert way, that's the cia. and most of those decisions are made in mr. brennan's basement
but it's unpopular overseas especially in pakistan where drones target terrorists living in the country. susan mcginnis, cbs news, washington. >>> time now is 5:10. an unusual response after a stranger is found sleeping in a house. >> i guess. a woman offers to give the intruder some coffee, then returns with something no one would expect. >> a hot air balloon crashing into a california home the moments leading up to this mishap. >> and what is cool about your school? you can submit your nomination on our website, cbssf.com/coolschool. and we just might come out and feature your school on the big show. we'll be right back. for over 60,000 california foster children nights can feel long and lonely. i miss my sister. i miss my old school. i miss my room. i don't want special treatment. i just wanna feel normal. to help, sleep train is collecting pajamas for foster children, big and small. bring your gift to any sleep train and help make a foster child's night a little cozier. not everyone can be a foster parent but anyone can help a foster child. we
the program perhaps in yemen, pakistan and other hot areas? >> suzanne, as you know, the principle architect, arguably, in yemen. he has traveled to yemen several times since the christmas day attempt in yemen to bring down u.s. flight over detroit. in the foundation that i work, new america foundation, in addition to cnn, we track that and we find that pakistan is going down rather dramatically, compared to 2010. it's expanding rapidly in yemen. one strike two years ago and there were probably -- at least 46 in this past year. so, he has presided over this policy. surely, it will be a topic at his nomination, whether you think of it negatively or positively. >> do you think it will have an impact by people who say this is not the way of doing things, going to war and going after terrorists? >> i doubt it, suzanne. i think there's broad support for this in general in washington and in congress. dealing most directly with the drones is satisfied in her own mind and has said publicly that the drones don't kill a lot of civilians, there's a great deal of caretaken with this. bro broadly speakin
with killing al qaeda operatives. it's unpopular overseas especially in pakistan, drones have targeted terrorists living in the country. now the president is also reportedly close to tapping jack lu, the white house chief of staff, to be the next treasury secretary replacing tim geithner. that would require a new chief of staff. this could be part of a larger shuffling of the president's team. >> susan mcginnis in washington this morning. thank you very much. >>> one of the critical issues of the president's foreign policy agenda is the winding down of the war in afghanistan. this friday, mr. obama meets with afghan president hamid karzai. they'll meet in washington to discuss u.s. troop levels in the afghan army. a key issue -- how many u.s. troops will remain in afghanistan after 2014. >>> a grim search resumes this morning for two new jersey teenagers who fell through the ice on a frozen lake. the lake is located about 50 miles northwest of new york city. the boys were walking on the lake last night about 200 yards from shore when they fell in. two residents
the nomination was announced, a u.s. drone reportedly killed eight more militants in pakistan. yesterday in the announcement at the white house, president obama praised brennan's high standards as an intelligence leader. >> he has worked to imbed our efforts in a strong legal framework. he understands we're a nation of laws. and in moments of debate and decision, he asks the tough questions and he insisted on high and rigorous standards. time and again he has spoken to the american people about our counter-terrorism policies because he recognizes we have a responsibility to be open and transparent as possible. >>> all right. so in the midst of that white house ceremony that was solid and tough stuff about national security, there was one moment of comedy styling, the line of the day goes to leon panetta who is leaving as defense secretary after a long career in washington. he spoke about his retirement plans. >> the time has come for me to return to my wife sylvia, our three sons, their families, our six grandchildren and my walnut farm. dealing with a different set of nuts. >> all right
, endangering the government of pakistan and risking the prospect that pakistan is very substantial arsenal of nuclear weapons would fall into radical hands. that's why we're there and if we lose sight of that and i think that's what the administration is doing, we'll find ourselves sooner, rather than later, under real threats once again. bill: that is a significant issue. something we'll watch especially tomorrow. thank you, sir. >> thank you. bill: john bolton in washington. martha of the. martha: this is a huge story right now. we have a deadly flu outbreak that is really causing havoc and so much illness in this country. one city has declared a public health emergency on this. so there's a lot you need to know. that's coming up. bill: also a mother saving her family from an intruder with her own gun. police just releasing the 911 calls of a terrifying home invasion. listen here. >> i heard a lot of screaming. >> right. i'm sure she's upset. >> no. she was shooting. as a mom, you spend a lot of time helping others. hamburger helper can help you back. and with box tops for education on e
pakistan. they don't trust hamid karzai coming here. you remarked in the book you think he was elected but to a lot of the folks, they just don't trust him. >> it's very difficult. president karzai is the elected landlord of the country. we can't view our partner nations that we can call the shots. that is not what we want with the partner. we want a sovereign nation that can be strong. think we need to look at it that way. that the effort that our current policy is trying to implement. >> neil: do you think this president even wants to be in this region? he was critical about the bellicose nature of the bush years and he wanted to reverse that. he was stuck with it coming in and he couldn't get request quicker leaving? >> i think all americans, when they look at the region now, it's where the thrift 9/11 emanated from. we've had a difficult decade. >> neil: what would you have done after 9/11? >> it's interesting, i thought a lot about this. i would have acted a little differently but only with hindsight. first thing i would have done is 10,000 young americans to language school. i wo
from countries like afghanistan and pakistan who say the strikes have killed several hundred innocent civilians. >> we endeavor to reduce civilian casualties as much as possible. and i think that the broader record here of success in taking the fight to al qaeda is one that has made the united states safer. >> there have been at least six u.s. drone strikes conducted already this year, shep. >> shepard: james, the president and john brennan say the drone program is illegal. >> yes. and they have erected all kinds of elaborate legal justifications for carrying out the strikes. the goal of all of that lawyering was to shield the u.s. from challenges under international law. but civil liberty advocates don't buy that drones are used decisions against combatants. >> the use of drones may be more precise than bombardment, but that isn't the right question that we should be asking. the question is, is the use of drones lawful in the places in which we are using them and against the people who are being killed? and the answer to that is, no. >> also controversial, double tap drone strikes in
availability on thursday afternoon. >> what is happening at the india and pakistan border? this time it is kind of a serious matter took place and fightings are happening at the border. according to -- [indiscernible] with president karzai coming here and things going on in washington and what is happening in afghanistan. what if india -- it might be hurting inya. >> well, the issue of tensions between india and pakistan is something that the secretary knows very well. we all hope that we can maintain peace and stability in the region. the secretary has affirmed that on visits throughout that region including to india. on tissue of terrorism, let me say that we stand with everyone in the world to include those in india and pakistan who take a hard line against terrorists who want to kill civilians whether they are pakistani, indian or american civilians. we believe there needs to be a united front against terrorist groups operating in that part of the world and others. >> as transition to what is the last time that the secretary had been asked by yained of any kind of help -- are they going to
that is a good idea. the fact is, afghanistan and pakistan, that nexus, the tribal border region there that is poorly defined and poured a controlled is perhaps the most dangerous place in the world to the united states. it is where al qaeda and began. it is where the remnants of al qaeda still exists. there was a drone strike reported within the last 24 hours against terrorists in that region. that is an area that will remain a threat for the foreseeable future. we can conduct drones strikes, gather intelligence, continue to keep an eye on that area, stabilize it and influence the direction it goes, because that is the part of the world that puts the united states most at risk. host: a sovereignty issue for pakistan, but also, karzai is expected to bring up sovereignty issues for afghanistan. what will he be saying? guest: president karzai correctly feels that he does not have control of what is going on inside his country. special operations, conducting raids inside afghanistan late at night without necessarily afghan permission, or not necessarily the afghans always doing is q
to his role in that subway plot. they were in contact with a shadowing al qaeda leader in pakistan known as ahmad. both using terms like wedding and marriage to refer to upcoming attacks. writing for example, the marriage is ready to suggest that they were ready to strike. naseer faces charges including providing material support to al qaeda and faces years in prison if convicted. >> shepard: the former president george h.w. bush is still in the hospital tonight. he is recovering but still no timetable for getting out of there. that's according to his spokesman. the former president bush 41 has been in the hospital since november, the day after thanksgiving for treatment of a bronchitis-related cough. he was later placed in intensive care tore nagging fever. he has since transferred to a hospital room. the spokesman said president bush the 41st is getting better and quote in recent days has taken great pride watching big football wins by texas a&m and the houston texans. while no immediate time line has been set for the president's discharge, the bushes wish to thank everyone for their m
is david headley. he was born in the united states. his mother is american. his father is from pakistan. the thing that made david headley most valuable to the terrorist groups that trained him was that he was an american, which meant that he could travel easily all over the world without attracting suspicion thanks to his american passport. when the ten attackers arrived in india for the mumbai terrorist attack, none of them had ever been to that city before, but they were able to pull off this highly coordinated, highly mobile multisite attack in a strange city they didn't know because of david headley. they knew exactly where to go because david headley had scouted everything for them. he had given them meticulously prepared videos and reports and gps coordinates about how to wage that assault on that city in november 2008. david headley was not arrested until almost a year after the attack in october 2009. u.s. officials picked him up at o'hare airport in chicago when he was en route to denmark in the midst of planning a second mumbai-style attack. the attack in denmark was going to
in pakistan. my job was to try to locate al qaeda fighters were al qaeda leaders and capture them to turn them over to the justice department's and have them face trial. that was the original idea, not to have them sit in cuba for the next decade. but we caught abu zubaydah. he was shot three times by pakistani police as he was tried to escape from his safe house. i was the first person to have custody of him, to sit with him. we spoke to each other extensively. we talked about everything from september 11 to poetry he had been writing to his family. then he was moved on to a secret prison after that. once i got back to headquarters, i heard he had been subject to harsh techniques, then called enhanced interrogation techniques, and i was asked by one of the leaders in this tsa's counter-terrorism center if i wanted to be trained in these of these techniques. i told them i had a moral problem with them and did not want to be involved. fast forward to 2007, by then, human-rights watch and in this international have reported al qaeda prisoners had been tortured and abc news called and said that t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)